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Roosting together but foraging apart; The spatial and social dynamics of the Natterer’s Bat

By Armin Kübelbeck

By Armin Kübelbeck

CHANGE OF SPEAKER – DUE TO ILLNESS SIMONE IS UNFORTUNATELY NOT ABLE TO GIVE HER TALK THIS EVENING.  WE ARE VERY FORTUNATE THAT, AT VERY SHORT NOTICE, TINA WIFFEN HAS OFFERED TO STEP IN.  HER TALK WILL BE ABOUT BATS IN THE NORTH EAST.

Illustrated talk by Simone Mordue

Friday 25 November, 7-8pm

Great North Museum: Hancock, Newcastle NE2 4PT.

Natterer’s Bats are typical of many British bats in that they participate in a variety of distinct seasonal communities and behaviours. In summer, adult females are thought to be loyal to their natal community/landscape where they rear their young. Individuals in communities are thought to constantly re-assort themselves across a network of roosts, although it is uncertain if these roosts are exclusive to one community or whether communities have key sites (e.g. social hubs). Their behaviour and social participation is largely unknown. Simone has been studying the spatial and social dynamics of one community of Natterer’s Bats in Northumberland to try and find out what is going on.

Simone Mordue is a PhD candidate at Newcastle University, School of Biology.