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A daily dose of nature is important, now more than ever

18th March 2020

Red-tailed Bumblebee (female) © John Buxton

There is no escaping that the next few months are going to be difficult. As social distancing becomes the norm, it is important to look after ourselves and to seek out positivity wherever we can find it. Thankfully, such positively abounds outside and in difficult times such as these, nature can provide a source of endless interest, joy and solace, as well as clear benefits for both physical and mental health.

Outside, the days are getting lighter, spring wildflowers are in bloom, amphibians are spawning, and many bird species have already begun to nest. Unchanged by the current turbulence, nature continues as it always has, as flora and fauna go about their lives responding to the changing seasons.

While it is important that we all follow the government guidance on social distancing, we can continue to enjoy the natural world and to use outdoor space as a place to learn, relax and unwind. The risks posed by coronavirus in open spaces are said to be minimal, providing you avoid crowds, and we would encourage people to continue to study and enjoy North East nature.

Now is the perfect time to appreciate your garden, explore somewhere new, practice wildlife identification and revel in the joy of the changing seasons. All can be done while distancing.

At NHSN, we’ll be practising what we preach. Staff and volunteers, while following the latest advice, will still find time for nature and look forward to updating you with their finds. Furthermore, we’ll also try to spread a little joy and interest online over the coming months, sharing things to look out for, things to do and read, and a new species to appreciate each day. Keep an eye on our Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram for the latest updates.

https://www.instagram.com/p/B96IesiAMWy/?utm_source=ig_web_copy_link

For 190 years, NHSN has stood as a place for people interested in natural history to share knowledge, socialise and, together, appreciate nature. While we may need to adapt the way we all do things for a short while, this continues to be the case. We hope you will join us spreading a little natural positivity in the coming weeks.

The NHSN team