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Talks, field trips, events & activities

Welcome to our action-packed programme of talks, outings and activities.

Red Squirrel - Jim Meikle ©

Upcoming events

15th
October
2019

The North East Otter Survey

The North East Otter Survey

Otter, GPNR © Mark Bowen

Tuesday 15 October, 5.30 – 6.30pm

With Dr Vivien Kent

Hear more about an annual project monitoring the population and distribution of Otters in North East England in this talk by Dr Vivien Kent.

NHSN members – FREE. You will be asked to provide your NHSN membership number during registration.
Non-members – £5.00. If you would like to join NHSN, please go to http://www.nhsn.ncl.ac.uk/join-us/become-a-member/

Booking essential. To book, please go to Eventbrite here.

15th
October
2019

The North East Otter Survey

The North East Otter Survey

Otter, GPNR © Mark Bowen

Tuesday 15 October, 5.30 – 6.30pm

With Dr Vivien Kent

Hear more about an annual project monitoring the population and distribution of Otters in North East England in this talk by Dr Vivien Kent.

NHSN members – FREE. You will be asked to provide your NHSN membership number during registration.
Non-members – £5.00. If you would like to join NHSN, please go to http://www.nhsn.ncl.ac.uk/join-us/become-a-member/

Booking essential. To book, please go to Eventbrite here.

18th
October
2019

Cocwudu: ancient woodlands, boundaries and territories in central Northumberland

Cocwudu: ancient woodlands, boundaries and territories in central Northumberland

Friday 18 October, 7.00pm-8.00pm, Newcastle University – Ridley Building 2, room RIDB2.1.65

with Max Adams

There is ‘something funny’ going on between the Coquet and the Wansbeck, according to Professor Brian Roberts.  In 2015 the Bernician Studies Group took up Brian Roberts’s challenge and began to investigate, through woodland visits and through map, place name and charter analysis.  Teams of botanists, tree historians and scholars of Early Medieval land holdings – particularly those of the Lindisfarne community of St Cuthbert – are revealing how patterns of ancient woodland can help to illuminate the forgotten evolution of a landscape and a lost frontier, hiding in plain view.

Max is an archaeologist and a historian of trees and landscape.  He is the author of The King in the North, The Wisdom of Trees, Aelfred’s Britain and Unquiet Women.  He lives and works in the Derwent valley of County Durham and is a Visiting Fellow at Newcastle University.

18th
October
2019

1829 Talk: Listening to the lichens of Corbridge

1829 Talk: Listening to the lichens of Corbridge

Friday 18 October, 18.29pm-18.45pm

With Alexandra Reynolds, Newcastle University

Some say that lichens are the living barometers of environmental change and can tell us so much about the world around us if we take the time to listen. Explore all things weird and wonderful as we delve into the miniature world of lichens to find out how crucial these lifeforms are for the health and diversity of our ecosystems.  Join Newcastle masters student Alex Reynolds as she discusses the intricacies of the lichens of Corbridge and how the lay of the land and the impact of human activity in the local area shapes the species who live here.

19th
October
2019

Hancock's Birds Tour

Hancock's Birds Tour

John Hancock in his Studio by H. H. Emmerson © NHSN

Saturday 19 October, 10.00 – 11.30am

N.B. This event is now fully booked, but there may still be places on the waitlist. To join the waitlist, follow the link to Eventbrite below, click on ‘Tickets’ and follow the instructions.

With Dan Gordon

Discover the life’s work of John Hancock as you tour the basement of the Discovery Museum with GNM: Hancock Biology Curator, Dan Gordon. This guided morning tour provides an opportunity to view and enjoy beautiful works of taxidermy created by the man who would later give his name to the ‘Hancock’ Museum.

N.B. Please note that this event takes place at the Discovery Museum, not the Great North Museum: Hancock.

NHSN members – FREE. You will be asked to provide your NHSN membership number during registration.
Non-members – £5.00. If you would like to join NHSN, please go to http://www.nhsn.ncl.ac.uk/join-us/become-a-member/

Booking essential. To book, please go to Eventbrite here.

22nd
October
2019

The Story of Barrack Wood

The Story of Barrack Wood

Tuesday 22 October, 5.30 – 6.30pm

With David Errington

This event highlights the work of Lloyd Currie from Seahouses who had a passion for natural history. A keen photographer, historian and poet, we will explore the background to Lloyd’s Barrack Wood book, which focuses on the flora and fauna of this area in Spindlestone, Northumberland, as well as acknowledge his love for the natural world through his photography and poetry.

NHSN members – FREE. You will be asked to provide your NHSN membership number during registration.
Non-members – £5.00. If you would like to join NHSN, please go to http://www.nhsn.ncl.ac.uk/join-us/become-a-member/

Booking essential. To book, please go to Eventbrite here.

25th
October
2019

UK Shale Oil: Fact or Fantasy?

UK Shale Oil: Fact or Fantasy?

Friday 25 October, 7.00pm-8.00pm, Newcastle University – Ridley Building 2, room RIDB2.1.65

with Timothy Daley, Geophysicist, Sanderling Seismic Services

Shale oil and gas production has surged in the USA and also hits the headlines in the UK with reports of billions of barrels and trillions of cubic feet of oil and gas potential. What is behind these vast numbers and how likely are they to be developed? First, we should understand how the hydrocarbon volumes are estimated and produced for conventional hydrocarbon fields. We will see that unconventional hydrocarbons (including shale) have fundamental differences in how the oil or gas is stored underground and subsequently produced. This explains why their resource assessments cover wide regions and the need for the dreaded ‘F’ word. This talk by Tim Daley, a seasoned oil geologist, will focus on how the oil and gas volumes are calculated, how much might actually be produced and what it would take to bring them on stream.

25th
October
2019

1829 Talk: Better the devil you know: addressing key data gaps for management of devil rays in the Indian Ocean

1829 Talk: Better the devil you know: addressing key data gaps for management of devil rays in the Indian Ocean

Friday 25 October, 18.29pm-18.45pm, Newcastle University – Ridley Building 2, room RIDB2.1.65

with Ellen Barrowclift- Mahon, Newcastle University

Elasmobranchs (sharks, rays, and skates) form a significant component of fisheries catch, both target and bycatch, worldwide. With the decline of these ecologically and socio-economically important species, assessing their conservation status and the impact of their removal from the marine environment represent major challenges for fisheries management. This is especially the case for small-scale fisheries in developing countries like those prevalent across the Indian Ocean. These fisheries contribute significantly to catch rates and supporting livelihoods but are largely poorly monitored and unregulated. Devil and manta rays (Mobula spp.) are extremely vulnerable to fisheries exploitation due to an extremely low reproductive rate. A growing international market for their gill plates, used for food and traditional medicine in East Asia, has increased the demand for these species and consequently the fisheries targeting them. This project aims to address crucial data gaps, specifically in taxonomy, population structure, and life history, to allow comprehensive status assessment and facilitate effective evidence-based management, in order to avoid further decline of these species

26th
October
2019

Conservation Volunteering at Gosforth Park Nature Reserve

Conservation Volunteering at Gosforth Park Nature Reserve

Saturday 26 October and 30 November, 10.00am – 1.00pm
Also every Wednesday, 10.00am – 1.00pm

At the reserve, there are always more tasks than there are people to do them. Each week, a handful of volunteers work for a few hours to make the reserve a better place for everyone, including wildlife! Tasks include:

  • building and maintaining boardwalks to increase accessibility
  • improving the hides for greater comfort and bird-watching potential
  • woodland management and restoration of native woodland
  • removal of invasive species to support and conserve our local species

There is something to do for members of all ages (teen & up) and abilities, and every little bit helps to ensure the short, medium and long-term success of our beautiful nature reserve. Whether you would like an opportunity to get active, to pick up new skills, meet new people, or add something to your CV, we need you at the reserve.

Training (and biscuits) will be provided, please wear sensible clothing and footwear.

28th
October
2019

Bird Ringing at GPNR

Bird Ringing at GPNR

Juvenile Pied Wagtail © Phil Hanmer

Monday 28 October,  10.00am – 1.00pm

N.B. This event is now fully booked, but there may still be places on the waitlist. To join the waitlist, follow the link to Eventbrite below, click on ‘Tickets’ and follow the instructions.

With Jane Gray and Philip Jordan

An opportunity to see birds visiting the feeding station in the hand and to learn what information may be gained through the study of bird movements. Join Dr Chris Redfern, and volunteer wardens Jane Gray and Philip Jordan to get up close and personal with the bird-life of the reserve.

NHSN members ONLY. You will be asked to provide your NHSN membership number during registration. If you would like to join NHSN, please go to http://www.nhsn.ncl.ac.uk/join-us/become-a-member/

Booking essential. To book, please go to Eventbrite here.

29th
October
2019

Northumberland Wildlife Trust's 'Catch My Drift' project

Northumberland Wildlife Trust's 'Catch My Drift' project

Bittern © Keith Cochrane

Tuesday 29 October, 5.30 – 6.30pm

With Sophie Webster, Northumberland Wildlife Trust

The initial phase of NWT’s new Catch My Drift project will allow the development of detailed plans to improve the land and habitat for people and wildlife on East Chevington nature reserve at Druridge Bay, Northumberland. In this talk, discover a new and exciting scheme set to provide a boost for wildlife and people at one of the North East’s premier wildlife-watching sites.

NHSN members – FREE. You will be asked to provide your NHSN membership number during registration.
Non-members – £5.00. If you would like to join NHSN, please go to http://www.nhsn.ncl.ac.uk/join-us/become-a-member/

Booking essential. To book, please go to Eventbrite here.

1st
November
2019

Why have we failed to protect nature?

Why have we failed to protect nature?

Friday 1 November, 7.00pm-8.00pm, Newcastle University – Ridley Building 2, room RIDB2.1.65

with Dr Niki Rust, Newcastle University

This talk will examine why humans have spectacularly failed to protect biodiversity and how we, as a species, can do things differently? Dr Niki Rust believes that one of the keys to solving the biodiversity crisis is through better communications – to activate and reignite the fire that we, as humans, all have inside ourselves to innately understand the important connections between nature and humanity. Niki will reflect on the climate agenda and suggest ways that we can learn from this to encourage not only a climate emergency movement but also an ecological emergency movement.

1st
November
2019

1829 Talk: Modelling Sociality in mammalian carnivores

1829 Talk: Modelling Sociality in mammalian carnivores

Badger - Dissington Hall grounds

Friday 1 November, 18.29pm-18.45pm, Newcastle University – Ridley Building 2, room RIDB2.1.65

With Jessica Ward, Newcastle University

Sociality is a behaviour that is seen only amongst a small fraction of carnivore species. A carnivore living as part of a group runs the risk of being eaten should they upset their groupmate. Yet there appear to be several benefits to group living that suggest it may be a favourable strategy. Why then are lions social but not tigers? Why do meerkats live in large groups but many mongoose species do not? Furthermore, why do some species such as the European badger live socially in some parts of their geographic range but not in others? My research investigates why sociality occurs in carnivores through considering their natural history, population processes and their environments. Using computational models to quantify the factors that influence the spatial and social organisation of mammalian carnivores we can understand how best to protect threatened carnivore species.

2nd
November
2019

Blyth Wildlife Walk

Blyth Wildlife Walk

Little Grebe - Edward Appleby © NHSN

Saturday 2 November, 9.00am – 12.30pm

N.B. This event is now fully booked, but there may still be places on the waitlist. To join the waitlist, follow the link to Eventbrite below, click on ‘Tickets’ and follow the instructions.

with Lindsay McDougall, WEBS recorder for the Blyth Estuary

Observe waders, wildfowl and a host of other species on the River Blyth before enjoying a  walk to Ridley Park where refreshments will be generously provided by Friends of Ridley Park.

NHSN members – FREE. You will be asked to provide your NHSN membership number during registration.
Non-members – £5.00. If you would like to join NHSN, please go to http://www.nhsn.ncl.ac.uk/join-us/become-a-member/

Booking essential. To book, please go to Eventbrite here.

5th
November
2019

'Catch My Drift' Guided Walk

'Catch My Drift' Guided Walk

Bittern - Edward Appleby © NHSN

Tuesday 5 November, 4.00 – 5.00pm

With Sophie Webster, Northumberland Wildlife Trust

The ‘Catch my Drift’ project, run by Northumberland Wildlife Trust, aims to develop a detailed plan to improve the land at East Chevington nature reserve, in Druridge Bay, for people and wildlife. Home to Bittern, Otter, Marsh Harrier and a plethora of other wetland and reedbed species, this guided walk with ‘Catch My Drift’ project officer, Sophie Webster, provides an excellent opportunity both to observe wildlife in the field, and to hear more about an exciting new project happening on our doorstep.

For more information about East Chevington nature reserve, visit https://www.nwt.org.uk/nature-reserves/east-chevington

NHSN members – FREE. You will be asked to provide your NHSN membership number during registration.
Non-members – £5.00. If you would like to join NHSN, please go to http://www.nhsn.ncl.ac.uk/join-us/become-a-member/

Booking essential. To book, please go to Eventbrite here.

8th
November
2019

1829 Talk: Landscapes of Predation - Investigating Upper Palaeolithic Visual Culture in the Côa Valley, Portugal

1829 Talk: Landscapes of Predation - Investigating Upper Palaeolithic Visual Culture in the Côa Valley, Portugal

Friday 8 November, 18.29pm-18.45pm, Newcastle University – Ridley Building 2, room RIDB2.1.65

with Lisa-elen Meyering, Durham University

Recognising prey within a landscape setting will have been of utmost importance to the survival of the hunter-gatherers of the past. In fact, distinguishing between species and selectively hunting for different types of prey will have meant that hunter-gatherers required expert and intimate knowledge of prey morphology, prey behaviour as well as suitable hunting strategies. In the absence of any faunal remains and oral traditions that we can interrogate today, we have to fall back onto a different kind of material record that hunter-gatherers have left behind: engravings in rock. This short talk will consider the animal depictions left behind by past “artists” within the Portuguese landscapes engulfing the river Côa. A novel approach of exploring archaeological material from a psychological viewpoint will be utilised that explores the interplay of vision and Upper Palaeolithic rock art-making (≈24-15,000 years BP).

8th
November
2019

Turning tides and shifting sands; marine conservation in Northumberland

Turning tides and shifting sands; marine conservation in Northumberland

Friday 8 November, 7.00pm-8.00pm, Newcastle University – Ridley Building 2, room RIDB2.1.65

with Martin Kitching, Regional Coordinator for Seawatch Foundation and North East Regional Officer for MARINElife

The North East of England has an incredible coastline and over the last decade, the conservation of our marine environment has been a dynamic, complex, and frequently controversial, topic.  Dr Martin Kitching (North East Regional Officer – MARINElife and Northumberland/Durham Regional Coordinator – Seawatch Foundation) has spent much of the last 10 years mapping the distribution of whales and dolphins off our coastline, using photo-Identification to track the movement of individual dolphins and informing ongoing discussions about where our marine protected areas should be located and what they should be protecting. Citizen science has a huge role to play in this ongoing story so come along and find out how…

9th
November
2019

Walk with a Warden

Walk with a Warden

GPNR in autumn © NHSN

Saturday 9 November, 10:00am – 12:00pm (extra hour optional)

With Des Matheson

Enjoy a walk around Gosforth Park Nature Reserve as you learn more about the history, management and wildlife of Newcastle’s oldest nature reserve. Ideal for beginners or new members. Attendees are welcome to depart the event following the ‘short loop’ or to remain for a lengthier tour of the tracks and trails on site.

NHSN members ONLY. You will be asked to provide your NHSN membership number during registration. If you would like to join NHSN, please go to http://www.nhsn.ncl.ac.uk/join-us/become-a-member/

Booking essential. To book, please go to Eventbrite here.

12th
November
2019

Discover the Wild West End Project

Discover the Wild West End Project

Hedgehog - Edward Appleby © NHSN

Tuesday 12 November, 5.30 – 6.30pm

With Ruth Hayward

Learn more about a new project giving protection to some of our most endangered and least understood wildlife around Arthur’s Hill and Wingrove, Newcastle. Focusing on at-risk bats, hedgehogs, swifts and house martins, this two-year project hopes to train up to 50 local residents in mapping different species and using the information to create wildlife-friendly environments in the heart of the West End.

NHSN members – FREE. You will be asked to provide your NHSN membership number during registration.
Non-members – £5.00. If you would like to join NHSN, please go to http://www.nhsn.ncl.ac.uk/join-us/become-a-member/

Booking essential. To book, please go to Eventbrite here.

15th
November
2019

Northumberland Wildlife Trust's Upland Nature Reserves

Northumberland Wildlife Trust's Upland Nature Reserves

Friday 15 November, 7.00pm-8.00pm, Newcastle University – Ridley Building 2, room RIDB2.1.65

With Duncan Hutt, Northumberland Wildlife Trust

The Trust now controls, or shares in the management of, a considerable area of upland Northumberland, covering a variety of habitats including blanket and raised bog, heather heath and the current rewilding project at Kielderhead. The largest reserve (and the largest in England) is Whitelee Moor (over 1,500 ha), and amongst the earliest with Trust involvement are the Border Mires (almost 3,000 ha) within the Forestry Commission’s Kielder Forest. The most recent acquisition is Benshaw Moor (over 250 ha), in Redesdale.

Duncan is Head of Living Landscapes and Conservation at the Trust, where he has worked for over two decades.

15th
November
2019

1829 Talk: Slugs count - mapping slug diversity in UK gardens

1829 Talk: Slugs count - mapping slug diversity in UK gardens

Friday 15 November, 18.29pm-18.45pm. Newcastle University – Ridley Building 2, room RIDB2.1.65

With Imogen Cavadino

Slugs and snails are notorious horticultural pests, widely detested by gardeners. However, not all species of slug and snail found in the UK are considered plant pests, with many species playing important roles in breaking down decaying material and recycling nutrients into the soil. In domestic gardens the presence of these pests is usually recognized by feeding damage, with the culprit species not identified, and little is actually known about which slug and snail species are present in UK gardens. Using citizen science, this project seeks to engage with gardeners in the UK and empower them to identify species of slug found in their garden and learn to appreciate and tolerate them.

22nd
November
2019

How will climate change affect insect pollinators and the wildflowers they feed from?

How will climate change affect insect pollinators and the wildflowers they feed from?

Friday 22 November, 7.00pm-8.00pm. Newcastle University – Ridley Building 2, room RIDB2.1.65

With Ellen Moss

“Bee declines” have been a media hot topic for several years now, but most of the coverage focuses on just one species: honeybees. The UK has around 250 species of native wild bees and many hundreds of species of flies, wasps, butterflies, and moths, all of which act as vital pollinators of our native plants and crops. Ellen’s research looks at how climate change affects this wider community of pollinating insects and wildflowers, and what the consequences could be for humans and society.

Ellen is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Newcastle, working on pollinators.

22nd
November
2019

1829 Talk: Increasing children’s knowledge of nature through participation in the citizen science project MammalWeb

1829 Talk: Increasing children’s knowledge of nature through participation in the citizen science project MammalWeb

Friday 22 November, 18.29pm-18.45pm

With Sammy Mason, Mammal Web

For children and teenagers, participating in ecological recording as part of a citizen science project may open up new opportunities to learn about, and connect with, the natural world around them. MammalWeb is a project that invites citizen scientists from across the UK to upload images from personal or borrowed camera traps. Citizen scientists then classify these images to create a database of mammal occurrence records. Throughout 2019, over 5,000 primary school children from almost 100 schools across northeast England are participating in MammalWeb. This talk will look at what, if any, positive impact being involved in MammalWeb has on school pupils, teachers, and parents. In particular focusing on their knowledge of UK mammals and connection to nature

23rd
November
2019

A Seasonal Guide to Tree ID

A Seasonal Guide to Tree ID

Saturday 23 November, 10.00 – 11.30am

N.B. This event is now fully booked, but there may still be places on the waitlist. To join the waitlist, follow the link to Eventbrite below, click on ‘Tickets’ and follow the instructions.

With Paul Drummond

Learn to tell your alders from your oaks and your hazels from your hornbeams in this interactive session with Reserve Warden, Paul Drummond.

NHSN members ONLY. You will be asked to provide your NHSN membership number during registration. If you would like to join NHSN, please go to http://www.nhsn.ncl.ac.uk/join-us/become-a-member/

Booking essential. To book, please go to Eventbrite here.

25th
November
2019

Bird Ringing at GPNR

Bird Ringing at GPNR

Juvenile Pied Wagtail © Phil Hanmer

Monday 25 November,  10.00am – 1.00pm

With Jane Gray and Philip Jordan

An opportunity to see birds visiting the feeding station in the hand and to learn what information may be gained through the study of bird movements. Join Dr Chris Redfern, and volunteer wardens and ornithologists Jane Gray and Philip Jordan to get up close and personal with the bird-life of the reserve.

NHSN members ONLY. You will be asked to provide your NHSN membership number during registration. If you would like to join NHSN, please go to http://www.nhsn.ncl.ac.uk/join-us/become-a-member/

Booking essential. To book, please go to Eventbrite here.

 

29th
November
2019

Morpeth Swift Project

Morpeth Swift Project

Friday 29 November, 7.00pm-8.00pm, Newcastle University – Ridley Building 2, room RIDB2.1.65

With Graham Sorrie

When he first moved to Lancaster Park, Graham Sorrie was delighted to find a pair of Swifts nesting on his house. However, a decade later, he noticed that the number of places for them to nest in Morpeth was reducing due to uPVC soffits or new extensions being built. Graham established the Morpeth Swift Conservation programme in 2014 and since then has been working tirelessly to raise awareness and encourage others to put up nest boxes. His work to protect this iconic migrant has persuaded a number of housing developers to install ‘swift bricks’ across various new developments in the Morpeth area.

 

 

30th
November
2019

Conservation Volunteering at Gosforth Park Nature Reserve

Conservation Volunteering at Gosforth Park Nature Reserve

Saturday 30 November, 10.00am – 1.00pm
Also every Wednesday, 10.00am – 1.00pm

At the reserve, there are always more tasks than there are people to do them. Each week, a handful of volunteers work for a few hours to make the reserve a better place for everyone, including wildlife! Tasks include:

  • building and maintaining boardwalks to increase accessibility
  • improving the hides for greater comfort and bird-watching potential
  • woodland management and restoration of native woodland
  • removal of invasive species to support and conserve our local species

There is something to do for members of all ages (teen & up) and abilities, and every little bit helps to ensure the short, medium and long-term success of our beautiful nature reserve. Whether you would like an opportunity to get active, to pick up new skills, meet new people, or add something to your CV, we need you at the reserve.

Training (and biscuits) will be provided, please wear sensible clothing and footwear.

1st
December
2019

Exclusive Wildlife Holidays with Naturetrek

Exclusive Wildlife Holidays with Naturetrek

Southern Cyprus: Wednesday 11th – Wednesday 18th March 2020, 8 days, £1395

This tour offers a week of birding and botanising on the Mediterranean island of Cyprus, which is generally bathed in sunshine during the spring. During this two-centre holiday, we will spend three nights in the historic town of Paphos, before moving close to the beautiful Akamas Peninsula National Park on the western side of the island for the subsequent four nights. From each base we will head out each day on gentle natural history walks in search of migrant birds, flowers and a variety of other wildlife, breaking with a taverna lunch or a picnic in a scenic spot. Highlights may include Black Francolin, Chukar Partridge, Bonelli’s Eagle, Long-legged Buzzard, migrating birds and the endemic Cyprus Warbler, plus some late orchids such as Fragrant orchids and Tongue orchids. At the end of each day there will be time to relax back at the hotel or stroll along the beautiful beach below.

Southern Portugal: Sunday 19th – Thursday 23rd April 2020, 5 days, £995

This holiday is timed to get the best from this beautiful region’s rich flora and diverse range of breeding and migratory birds, from Cork Oak forests to the wide-open grass plains and parkland, we will encounter much of interest and wonder. Perched high above the Guadiana River, our base in the beautiful hilltop town of Mértola, offers fine opportunities to explore both the stunning flower-studded plains around Castro Verde — where we hope to see both Great and Little Bustards, Stone Curlew and numerous Montagu’s Harriers — and the rugged, seldom explored savannah country towards the Spanish border, where we might encounter Black-shouldered Kite, Black Vulture, Great Spotted Cuckoo and Black-bellied Sandgrouse. Ocellated Lizards, the largest European lizard, are common in this area, and the rivers are full of terrapins and water snakes. Mértola itself has a large colony of Lesser Kestrels and the sight of several dozen of these beautiful birds wheeling around in the evening sky above the castle and 14th-century Franciscan convent is something to be remembered.

Abruzzo in Autumn: Friday 11th to Friday 18th September 2020, 8 days, £1495

In mid-September, Abruzzo National Park is bursting with the fruitfulness of autumn, and our aim during this leisurely week-long holiday is to enjoy the area’s mammal and birdlife as it prepares for the coming winter as well as late-flowering plants. Setting out each day from our delightful family-run hotel base, we’ll select a scenic spot at which to break our daily walk with a delicious lunch made from local produce, and the opportunity to scan the mountain slopes around us for Red Deer, Chamois and Alpine Chough. In September the area’s Brown (‘Marsican’) Bears are fattening up on the seasonal glut of berries — in particular on Alpine Buckthorn berries — and we’ll look for these on an optional afternoon/evening excursion to Refugio l’orio followed by a candlelit supper. Traditional cuisine and aromatic local wines make this a thoroughly well-rounded Italian experience far from the tourist crowds!

For more information about any of these holidays or to book, please call the Naturetrek office on 01962 733051 or email info@naturetrek.co.uk


Naturetrek has been nominated ‘Best Safari, Wildlife & Nature Holiday Company’ in the prestigious British Travel Awards, and currently, are in second place in the voting! If you feel they are worthy of this award and might like to vote, please click on this link https://www.britishtravelawards.com/btaform.php?nomLink=117 (there are many other categories and companies that have been nominated and it is possible to access the list from this link). As a thank you for taking the time to vote, the British Travel Awards enters everyone into a prize draw with some great holiday prizes for grabs.

3rd
December
2019

Discovering Redesdale

Discovering Redesdale

Emperor Moth © Cain Scrimgeour

Tuesday 3 December, 5.30 – 6.30pm

With Cain Scrimgeour & Heather Devey, Wild Intrigue

Gain an insight into a new Wild Intrigue project established to monitor and celebrate the wildlife of Redesdale, one of the most under-recorded areas in Northumberland.

NHSN members – FREE. You will be asked to provide your NHSN membership number during registration.
Non-members – £5.00. If you would like to join NHSN, please go to http://www.nhsn.ncl.ac.uk/join-us/become-a-member/

Booking essential. To book, please go to Eventbrite here.

6th
December
2019

Climate Change Impacts

Climate Change Impacts

Friday 6 December, 7.00pm-8.00pm, Newcastle University – Ridley Building 2, room RIDB2.1.65

with Prof. Hayley Fowler, Professor of Climate Change Impacts, School of Civil Engineering & Geosciences, Newcastle University

Are high rainfall events set to become more common? Intense flooding events (e.g. at the Toddbrook Reservoir, near Whalley Bridge) are not a new phenomena in the UK, but are they becoming more frequent and intense? Prof Fowler has made an exceptional scientific contribution to our understanding of the impacts of climate change on water systems, specialising in recent trends in climate extremes and their impacts on future projections of flood and drought risks. This talk will focus on Prof. Fowler’s research from the UK and around the globe.

6th
December
2019

1829 Talk: The Use of Video for Monitoring Wild Mammals and Enhancing Public Engagement

1829 Talk: The Use of Video for Monitoring Wild Mammals and Enhancing Public Engagement

Friday 6 December, 18.29pm-18.45pm

With Sian Green, Mammal Web

Camera traps (motion-sensitive cameras) are an increasingly popular tool for monitoring wildlife, both for scientific research purposes and recreational use. When triggered, many camera traps are able to record either a short burst of photographs or short video clip. Currently, most research is done using photos, rather than videos, however, this is beginning to change. In this talk, I will be introducing my research designed to test the difference between photo and video settings and discussing the potential advantages and disadvantages of using video from both an ecological perspective and a public engagement one.

About Talks, Field Trips, Events & Activities

2019 Winter Talks

A downloadable, easy to read programme of our pre-Christmas winter talks can be found here, or download a poster of titles and dates here. Please share this with friends, family any anyone else you feel may be interested in delving deeper into the realm of environmental science this season.

Outdoor Events

Throughout the year, experts lead field meetings to explore the natural world and magical landscapes of Northern England.

Outdoor events are free to members, while non-members are asked to provide a small donation. Some outdoor events – those requiring monetary support – will be charged, with NHSN members receiving a significant discount.

For many events, you can just turn up at the meeting place, but some events must be booked in advance and this is stated in the event information. You must make your own way to the meeting point. Please arrive early so that the event can start on time.

In order to visit the best places our trips take place in natural landscapes that can be unpredictable. It is essential that you wear, or take with you, appropriate clothing and accessories to cope with heat, cold, wet, wind, biting insects and to walk on uneven, slippery or wet surfaces. Before you join any of our outdoor events it is essential that you read our Guidance.

It is always advisable (and likely cheaper) for non-members wishing to attend multiple NHSN events to join us.

Friday Night Talks

From October to March, the Society invites experts in the natural world to give inspiring lectures to our members and the wider public. We also have a series of shorter talks, ‘1829’, presented by early-career scientists and current researchers in a variety of topics before the main talk each week.

Due to popular demand for our talks, Newcastle University has kindly made available a larger venue at their Ridley Building. A map to the new venue and parking details are below.

Entry is from 6.00pm for our new 15-minute 1829 talks (starting at 18:29). Tea, coffee and biscuits are available and the opportunity to socialise. Speakers of our main talks (7.00 – 8.00pm) give an illustrated presentation for 45 mins-1 hour and then open the floor for questions.

On site parking is limited to blue badge holders only. There is a public car park directly opposite the Ridley Building on Claremont Road.

Non-members are very welcome to attend, and we ask that they kindly make a donation on the night to support these lectures.

View Previous Events

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Amazing footage of White-beaked Dolphins off the #Northumberland coast.

Cocwudu: ancient woodlands in Northumberland. https://t.co/RedkhaqzQf 🌳

Join us this Friday for the next of our #NHSNTalks and hear how patterns of ancient woodland can help to illuminate the forgotten evolution of a landscape and a lost frontier, hiding in plain view. #botany

The BBC has reported on news that five red squirrels have been found dead in less than two weeks at Havannah Nature Reserve. @SaveNclWildlife have submitted the squirrels for testing in an effort to determine the cause of the death. . #redsquirrel #squirrel #newcastle #wildlife

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