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Talks, field trips, events & activities

Welcome to our action-packed programme of talks, outings and activities.

Red Squirrel - Jim Meikle ©

Upcoming events

11th
January
2019

Building peace to save nature: the importance of studying human-human interactions in conservation

Building peace to save nature: the importance of studying human-human interactions in conservation

Friday 11 January, 7.00pm-8.00pm. Newcastle University – Ridley Building 2, room RIDB2.1.65

With Dr Isla Hodgson

Are we studying the wrong species?

In trying to address environmental problems, we often overlook the relevance of studying and managing people. Conservation conflict researcher and mediator Dr Isla Hodgson explains the importance of understanding the social and political sides to saving nature, and how we can draw on the principles of trust- building and negotiation from humanitarian conflicts to solve wars over wildlife. She reflects on her own experiences “on the front-line”, including her most recent work studying the conflict over raptor conservation and driven grouse shooting in Scotland.

 

11th
January
2019

Through the eyes of a wolf: Quantifying and classifying the facial signalling of wolves (Canis lupus) and domestic dogs

Through the eyes of a wolf: Quantifying and classifying the facial signalling of wolves (Canis lupus) and domestic dogs

Friday 11 January, 18.29pm-6.45pm – Newcastle University – Ridley Building 2, room RIDB2.1.65

With Elana Hobkirk

My research quantifies the facial expressions of wolves and dogs, and links these to affective states, and demonstrates how the morphological differences domestic dogs possess (from their wolf ancestry), limits their ability to produce the same range of affective facial expressions wolves are capable of. My research suggests that wolves have comparable facial expressions to simian primates, and shows that the limitations of domestic dogs pose many implications with dog-dog communication and our own understanding of our companion canids

18th
January
2019

Climate-Driven changes in Rocky Shore Communities

Climate-Driven changes in Rocky Shore Communities

Friday 18 January, 7.00pm-8.00pm – Newcastle University – Ridley Building 2, room RIDB2.1.65

With Heather Sugden

Climate change is causing rapid responses in marine communities, with species in many taxonomic groups showing fast shifts in biogeographic range. Heather will describe a multidisciplinary approach to identify patterns within long-term datasets and the processes driving these patterns. She will then talk about shifts across the boundaries and what is happening in the northeast on a local level together with the results from current work.

Heather is a Teaching Fellow at Newcastle University whose research includes studies on factors affecting marine communities and Citizen Science research projects such as Capturing Our Coast and The Big Sea Survey

18th
January
2019

Fitbits for seals? Using new technology to pry into the intimate lives of grey seals

Fitbits for seals? Using new technology to pry into the intimate lives of grey seals

Friday 18 January, 18.29pm-6.45pm – Newcastle University – Ridley Building 2, room RIDB2.1.65

With Courtney Shuert

Technology is rapidly evolving. Recent advances in sensor technology have allowed us to track our every movement, daily routines, and the calories we burn over time. Here I present my work applying similar technologies to pry into the intimate lives of grey seal mothers as they raise their pups through the intensive, two and a half week lactation period taking place every autumn. Tracking trends in movement and heart rate in these wild grey seals over this period has revealed some interesting strategies to managing such a energy-demanding period including differences in behaviour and innate personality, as well as how individuals are able to cope physiologically with the various pressures of a warming climate and, ultimately, how these differences may affect her pup’s development.

19th
January
2019

Slavonian Grebes and a Seawatch at Stag Rocks

Slavonian Grebes and a Seawatch at Stag Rocks

Common Scoter © Andrew Motion

Saturday 19 January, 9.00am-12.00pm

Enjoy a bracing ‘seawatch’ with local naturalists James Common and Sacha Elliott in the attempt to locate seldom-seen maritime birds, including Slavonian Grebe, Long-tailed Duck, Velvet Scoter and Great Northern Diver. Harkess, or ‘Stag rocks’, is an excellent winter site and one of the best in Northumberland to observe some of our more elusive maritime species.

Sturdy footwear is recommended. Please bring your own optics if possible: we recommend telescopes. Wrap up warm.

Free to members. If you are not an NHSN member, we would welcome a suggested donation of £5:
http://www.nhsn.ncl.ac.uk/join-us/make-a-donation/

Or please consider joining us:
http://www.nhsn.ncl.ac.uk/join-us/become-a-member/

Booking essential. To book, please go to Eventbrite here.

22nd
January
2019

Northumbria Veteran Trees Project

Northumbria Veteran Trees Project

Tuesday 22 January, 5.30-7.00pm

The significance of Ancient, veteran and notable trees, and the struggles and conflicts faced by these trees in order to attain such status, will be outlined by Nick Johnson, project officer for the Northumbria veteran tree project. Nick will also outline the project to date and explain how you, too, can play a part in this Heritage Lottery-funded venture.

Free to members. If you are not an NHSN member, we would welcome a suggested donation of £5:
http://www.nhsn.ncl.ac.uk/join-us/make-a-donation/

Or please consider joining us:
http://www.nhsn.ncl.ac.uk/join-us/become-a-member/

Booking essential. To book, please go to Eventbrite here.

25th
January
2019

Geohazards in the UK

Geohazards in the UK

Friday 25 January, 7.00pm-8.00pm – Newcastle University – Ridley Building 2, room RIDB2.1.65

With Helen Reeves, British Geological Survey

Dr. Reeves leads the £3m annual NERC/BGS Engineering Geology research programme investigating the processes and the spatial distribution of shallow geohazards in the UK (particularly landslides and subsidence), and the geotechnical & geophysical properties of the UK landmass and urban geoscience challenges in cities.

26th
January
2019

Guided Roe Deer Walk

Guided Roe Deer Walk

Roe Deer, GPNR © Richard Potts

Saturday 26 January, 9.00 – 10.30am

Gosforth Park Nature Reserve is one of the few sites within the limits of Newcastle where Roe Deer roam in abundance. Join NHSN supporter and wildlife photographer, Chris Castling, to find and photograph them for yourself in a morning guided walk.

Free to members. If you are not an NHSN member, we would welcome a suggested donation of £5:
http://www.nhsn.ncl.ac.uk/join-us/make-a-donation/

Or please consider joining us:
http://www.nhsn.ncl.ac.uk/join-us/become-a-member/

Booking essential. To book, please go to Eventbrite here.

29th
January
2019

An Introduction to Botanical Art

An Introduction to Botanical Art

Tuesday 29 January, 5.30-7.00pm

Botanical artist Dr Alison Cutts gives an insight into the history and importance of botanical illustration, showcasing examples from historical and contemporary work. Join us in our Council Room at the Great North Museum: Hancock for an up-close look at beautiful illustrations and an opportunity to hear more about both techniques and renowned artists.

Free to members. If you are not an NHSN member, we would welcome a suggested donation of £5:
http://www.nhsn.ncl.ac.uk/join-us/make-a-donation/

Or please consider joining us:
http://www.nhsn.ncl.ac.uk/join-us/become-a-member/

Booking essential. To book, please go to Eventbrite here.

1st
February
2019

A long-term study of Guillemots on Skomer Island

A long-term study of Guillemots on Skomer Island

Friday 1 February, 7.00-8.00pm – Newcastle University – Ridley Building 2, room RIDB2.1.65

With Tim Birkhead

Every summer for the past 46 years, Tim has travelled to the island of Skomer, just off the Pembrokeshire coast in south-west Wales, to monitor the guillemots that breed there. Over the last 46 years he has witnessed the impact of environmental change on these birds. He has seen oil spills kill thousands of guillemots and despaired at the way increasingly severe winter storms result in ‘wrecks’ of huge numbers of seabirds. He has also observed the stark impact of climate change on Skomer’s guillemots – with the birds now breeding a full two weeks earlier than they did in the 1970s.

Long-term studies like this provide unique and extraordinary insights into how populations work, while also providing a bank of data essential for interpreting future changes. Join Tim to hear more about the Skomer guillemots, their status as the ‘barometer of the ocean’, and their fate as climate change and other, unrelated factors apply new pressure to the colony.

 

1st
February
2019

Using beehive fences as a natural deterrent to crop-raiding elephants in Kenya

Using beehive fences as a natural deterrent to crop-raiding elephants in Kenya

Friday 1 February, 18.29-6.45pm – Newcastle University – Ridley Building 2, room RIDB2.1.65

With Esther Serem

In the past few years, African elephants have been discovered to instinctively avoid African honeybees. Elephants and Bees project based in Kenya use beehive fences to deter crop-raiding elephants hence boosting the economy of the affected communities through sustainable harvest of honey and pollination services and, encouraging the co-existence between the two species. Esther Serem, (an MSc student in the school) worked with this innovative project for the past 2 years and she is going to share information about how the giant elephants run away from the tiny bees.

2nd
February
2019

Winter Tree Identification at Tyne Riverside Country Park

Winter Tree Identification at Tyne Riverside Country Park

Saturday 02 February, 10.00am-12.00pm

Join expert, Bill Mulhacen, as you get to grips with our region’s trees in winter. Learn to identify a range of species without the aid of foliage based on bark, buds and other distinguishing factors during a short walk along the banks of the Tyne.

Free to members. If you are not an NHSN member, we would welcome a suggested donation of £5:
http://www.nhsn.ncl.ac.uk/join-us/make-a-donation/

Or please consider joining us:
http://www.nhsn.ncl.ac.uk/join-us/become-a-member/

Booking essential. To book, please go to Eventbrite here.

5th
February
2019

Inspired by Northumberland's Nature

Inspired by Northumberland's Nature

© Andy Craig

Tuesday 05 February, 5.30-7.00pm
Tuesday 05 March, 5.30-7.00pm

Join Northumberland based, award-winning photographer and musician Andy Craig for an excitingly different evening, combining Andy’s landscape and nature photography with music and song.  Andy will share his photographs in themed slideshows and explain how he draws inspiration from nature, landscapes and seascapes of the Northumberland Coast.

This talk will take place in the NHSN Council Room at our home on the second floor of the Great North Museum: Hancock.

Free to members. If you are not an NHSN member, we would welcome a suggested donation of £5:
http://www.nhsn.ncl.ac.uk/join-us/make-a-donation/

Or please consider joining us:
http://www.nhsn.ncl.ac.uk/join-us/become-a-member/

Booking essential. To book, please go to Eventbrite here.

8th
February
2019

The impact of two-low cost devices, used in reducing marine mammal bycatch, upon the target catch of drift-net fisheries in Zanzibar, Tanzania

The impact of two-low cost devices, used in reducing marine mammal bycatch, upon the target catch of drift-net fisheries in Zanzibar, Tanzania

Friday 08 February, 18.29pm-6.45pm – Newcastle University – Ridley Building 2, room RIDB2.1.65

With Louise Hopkins

Bycatch is known to be one of the greatest threats to marine mammal populations, with increasing recognition that small-scale fisheries play a large role in this. The use of bycatch reduction devices is mandatory in many areas of the world for larger vessels; however, challenges such as high cost of these devices prevent them from being adequately utilised by small-scale fisheries. Further challenges arise where fishermen are unwilling to use devices if they are believed to have a detrimental impact upon their catch. The study presented here looks at how two low-cost devices, created from recycled bottles, impact upon the target catch of small-scale drift-net fisheries in Zanzibar, Tanzania

9th
February
2019

Walk with a Warden at Gosforth Park Nature Reserve

Walk with a Warden at Gosforth Park Nature Reserve

Kingfisher © Terry Cavner

Saturday 9 February, 10.00am-12.00pm

Keen to learn more about Gosforth Park Nature Reserve? Why not join us for a guided walk with volunteer warden, Des Matheson, and learn more about the wildlife, history and management of this treasured green space. Ideal for first-time visitors, this event provides an opportunity to find your feet and experience the reserve in the company of those who know it best.

Gosforth Park Nature Reserve is home to a range of rare and elusive species and on a typical visit, there is the potential to encounter bittern, roe deer, kingfisher, red fox, red squirrel and more.

Free to members. If you are not an NHSN member, we would welcome a suggested donation of £5:
http://www.nhsn.ncl.ac.uk/join-us/make-a-donation/

Or please consider joining us:
http://www.nhsn.ncl.ac.uk/join-us/become-a-member/

Booking essential. To book, please go to Eventbrite here.

10th
February
2019

An Introduction to Winter Tree Identification

An Introduction to Winter Tree Identification

Sunday 10 February, 10.00am-12.00pm

There is much more to trees than just their leaves. Ideal for beginners, this event aims to teach attendees how to identify common trees during the winter months, based on bark, buds and other features.

Join NHSN Reserve Warden, Paul Drummond, at Gosforth Park Nature Reserve to tell your Wych Elms from your willows and your Alders from your ashes without the visual aid of foliage.

Free to members. If you are not an NHSN member, we would welcome a suggested donation of £5:
http://www.nhsn.ncl.ac.uk/join-us/make-a-donation/

Or please consider joining us:
http://www.nhsn.ncl.ac.uk/join-us/become-a-member/

Booking essential. To book, please go to Eventbrite here.

12th
February
2019

Forgotten Journals

Forgotten Journals

Colin Pittendrigh's GPNR notebook, 1929 © NHSN

Tuesday 12 February, 5.30-7.00pm

In this creative writing session led by Jenna Clake, consider the forgotten journals and notebooks of the NHSN archives: Colin S. Pittendrigh’s guide, Gosforth Park – written and carefully put together when he was just seventeen – and George Gibsone’s collection of shell paintings. Use these as inspiration to start your own writing.

Writing materials will be provided, though you are welcome to bring your own.

Free to members. If you are not an NHSN member, we would welcome a suggested donation of £5:
http://www.nhsn.ncl.ac.uk/join-us/make-a-donation/

Or please consider joining us:
http://www.nhsn.ncl.ac.uk/join-us/become-a-member/

Booking essential. To book, please go to Eventbrite here.

15th
February
2019

Plants Behaving Badly

Plants Behaving Badly

Friday 15 February, 7.00p,-8.00pm – Newcastle University – Ridley Building 2, room RIDB2.1.65

With Chris Metherell

A tour around some of the taxonomic terrors and sulky teenagers of the plant world. A chance to dig into the sex lives of some of the most ill-mannered members of the vegetable persuasion and find out what makes them so unruly. 

 Chris is the botanical recorder for vice-county 68 (North Northumberland), and is Honorary General Secretary of the Botanical Society of Britain and Ireland. 

19th
February
2019

Observing and Drawing a Gastropod Shell

Observing and Drawing a Gastropod Shell

Tuesday 19 February, 5.30-7.00pm

Join us in the NHSN Council Room for an opportunity to observe the intricacies of Gastropod shells, followed by a crash course in how to draw them. Observe a range of illustration techniques first-hand and hear more about the close-knit relationship between art and science.

Please bring along a shell, if possible. Art materials will be provided.

Free to members. If you are not an NHSN member, we would welcome a suggested donation of £5:
http://www.nhsn.ncl.ac.uk/join-us/make-a-donation/

Or please consider joining us:
http://www.nhsn.ncl.ac.uk/join-us/become-a-member/

Booking essential. To book, please go to Eventbrite here.

22nd
February
2019

Keeping the railways going - the effect of landslips on the rail network

Keeping the railways going - the effect of landslips on the rail network

Friday 22 February, 7.00pm,-8.00pm – Newcastle University – Ridley Building 2, room RIDB2.1.65

With Clare Brint, Network Rail

A 25 m deep cutting slope at Farnley Haugh suffered a significant failure on 7 January 2016 resulting in the closure of the Newcastle to Carlisle Line between Hexham and Prudhoe for just over a month.  This talk will examine the remediation of this and other historic slips across the North, and how Network Rail ensures the railway operates safely and reliably.

23rd
February
2019

Wildfowl in Druridge Bay

Wildfowl in Druridge Bay

Smew © Florence Davies

Saturday 23 February, 9.00am-12.00pm

Enjoy a walk between the Northumberland Wildlife Trust sites of Druridge Pools and East Chevington as we aim to see as many wildfowl species as possible in one morning. Among these, we hope to see Whooper Swan, Pintail, Pink-footed Goose, Shoveler, White-fronted Goose and possibly, Smew. Given the diverse nature of these sites, you never quite know what you may encounter, and attendees may also see Twite, Snow Bunting, Bittern and a variety of mammals.

Led by local naturalists Sacha Elliott and James Common, this walk will involve bird watching both in hides, and on foot, so sturdy footwear is recommended. Please bring your own binoculars and/or telescopes, if possible.

Free to members. If you are not an NHSN member, we would welcome a suggested donation of £5:
http://www.nhsn.ncl.ac.uk/join-us/make-a-donation/

Or please consider joining us:
http://www.nhsn.ncl.ac.uk/join-us/become-a-member/

Booking essential. To book, please go to Eventbrite here.

26th
February
2019

Fables and the Natural World

Fables and the Natural World

'The Greyhound Fox', Thomas Bewick

Tuesday 26 February, 5.30-7.00pm

In this workshop with writer Jenna Clake, we will use Thomas Bewick’s illustrated editions of ‘Fables’ as a starting point to think about how animals, their characteristics and mannerisms can help inspire our own writing. Write your own short moral tales or poems based on local wildlife.

Writing materials will be provided, though you are welcome to bring your own.

Free to members. If you are not an NHSN member, we would welcome a suggested donation of £5:
http://www.nhsn.ncl.ac.uk/join-us/make-a-donation/

Or please consider joining us:
http://www.nhsn.ncl.ac.uk/join-us/become-a-member/

Booking essential. To book, please go to Eventbrite here.

1st
March
2019

The caddis (Trichoptera) of Northumberland and Durham

The caddis (Trichoptera) of Northumberland and Durham

Friday 01 March, 7.00pm,-8.00pm – Newcastle University – Ridley Building 2, room RIDB2.1.65

With Ian Wallace

Caddis larvae are familiar to most people who have sampled aquatic insects and the larva’s ability to build protective cases is fascinating. The larvae are often used as indicators of water quality. The adults are frequently encountered by people using light traps, but otherwise are less well known, yet there are nearly 200 British and Irish species. 

Ian is from Newcastle and took his first and second degrees at Newcastle University.  He moved in 1974 to what is now entitled World Museum Liverpool, where he held various posts before retiring a few years ago.  His Research degree was on the taxonomy of caddis larvae and he has continued to work intensively with that group.  He has written standard identification keys to the UK caddis larvae and runs the UK caddis Recording Scheme which has amassed over 400,000 entries which are made available on the NBN Atlas website. 

1st
March
2019

Prevalence of pelagic dependence among coral reef predators across an atoll seascape

Prevalence of pelagic dependence among coral reef predators across an atoll seascape

Friday 01 March, 18.29pm,-6.45pm – Newcastle University – Ridley Building 2, room RIDB2.1.65

With Christina Skinner

Through fisheries, coral reefs provide food security to millions of people around the tropics, but the main target species are declining due to climate change and multiple direct anthropogenic stressors.  Apex predators such as sharks may be partly sustained by pelagic inputs to outer reef slopes, but how widespread is this dependence across all fishery target species and is it confined to the outside of atolls? I use biological markers (stable isotopes) in fish tissue to investigate how reliant reef fishery target predators are on planktonic food sources. Reef-pelagic connectivity helps sustain important food resources on degraded oceanic reefs but its disruption by ocean warming highlights the need for management plans that transcend the boundaries of this threatened ecosystem.

2nd
March
2019

Treasures of the NHSN collections

Treasures of the NHSN collections

Head of Hancock's specimen of the adult Great Auk © NHSN

Saturday 02 March, 11.00am-1.00pm

Join GNM: Hancock Biology Curator Dan Gordon for an opportunity to view a host of rare, extinct and unusual items in the NHSN collections. This includes our very own Great Auk, Lammergeier and Dodo.

Please note that this event takes place at the Discovery Museum.

Free to members. If you are not an NHSN member, we would welcome a suggested donation of £5:
http://www.nhsn.ncl.ac.uk/join-us/make-a-donation/

Or please consider joining us:
http://www.nhsn.ncl.ac.uk/join-us/become-a-member/

Booking essential. To book, please go to Eventbrite here.

8th
March
2019

George Johnston and the Dredgers

George Johnston and the Dredgers

Friday 08 March, 7.00pm-8.00pm – Newcastle University – Ridley Building 2, room RIDB2.1.65

With Prof Peter Davis

In the July 1855 issue of the Annals and Magazine of Natural Historythe marine biologist Philip Henry Gosse named a species of sabellid worm Othonia johnstoni , stating ‘I have named this species after George Johnston, who may be called the father of our marine invertebrate zoology’.  Johnston (1797-1855was indeed a figure of national significance; through his correspondence with notable scientists and his major taxonomic publications, Johnston influenced marine biology at a national level.  However, as a doctor based in Berwick upon Tweed, he also formed an active network of naturalists in Northumberland, having particularly strong links with those based in Newcastle, and with Joshua Alder and Albany Hancock in particular. Peter Davis will introduce us to George Johnston and to many former members of the Natural History Society of Northumbria who worked with him to promote an understanding of marine life. 

12th
March
2019

Writing about Climate Change and Conservation

Writing about Climate Change and Conservation

Comma © Ken Dawson

Tuesday 12 March, 5.30-7.00pm

In this session with writer Jenna Clake, we will use the NHSN library to gather information about climate change, pollution and conservation, and its effects on the natural world. We will then think about ways to use this information creatively in our writing to address environmental issues.

Writing materials will be provided, though you are welcome to bring your own.

Free to members. If you are not an NHSN member, we would welcome a suggested donation of £5:
http://www.nhsn.ncl.ac.uk/join-us/make-a-donation/

Or please consider joining us:
http://www.nhsn.ncl.ac.uk/join-us/become-a-member/

Booking essential. To book, please go to Eventbrite here.

15th
March
2019

Britain’s Rarest plants

Britain’s Rarest plants

Coral Root Orchid © Paul Drummond

Friday 15 March, 7.00pm,-8.00pm – Newcastle University – Ridley Building 2, room RIDB2.1.65

With Fred Rumsey

Fred will provide a virtual tour of the British Isles making a very personal selection of the plants he believes to be the rarest and looking at the reasons behind their rarity. The notion that special plants frequently grow in special places, often leading to hotspots of biodiversity, will be explored and some of those special areas looked at in more detail. 

 Fred Rumsey is Senior Curator in Charge: British & Irish fern and historic herbaria, Natural History Museum, London. 

15th
March
2019

Ecological consequences of European arrival in the cloud forests of Ecuador

Ecological consequences of European arrival in the cloud forests of Ecuador

Friday 15 March, 18.29pm,- 6.45pm – Newcastle University – Ridley Building 2, room RIDB2.1.65

With Nick Loughlin

Indigenous peoples have lived and farmed in the cloud forests of Ecuador for thousands of years, but what happened when Spanish conquistadors arrived? How did one of the most biodiverse forests in the world respond? And how can we able to reconstruct past vegetation in order to help inform us about the future?

22nd
March
2019

NHSN Annual General Meeting and Social Evening

NHSN Annual General Meeting and Social Evening

Full house for our AGM © NHSN

Friday 22 March, 7.00 – 8.15pm

Join staff, supporters, members and volunteers for a friendly social evening as we look back over another successful year in the life of NHSN.

From our record-breaking annual open day at Gosforth Park Nature Reserve and our exciting ‘Towards 2029’ project, to our new student talk series and blossoming events schedule, hear more about the latest happenings inside NHSN and discover our plans for the future.

Our AGM provides the perfect opportunity to socialise with friends and fellow NHSN supporters, while getting up to date on what we have been up to in a short series of interesting talks.

This event will be held in the Clore Suite at the Great North Museum: Hancock. Refreshments will be available throughout. All are welcome.

We look forward to seeing you there!

26th
March
2019

Observe and Draw a Winter Twig

Observe and Draw a Winter Twig

Tuesday 26 March, 5.30-7.00pm

Get to grips with botanical art in this winter-themed session with Dr Alison Cutts. Learn to accurately illustrate twigs, with emphasis on portraying colour and texture. This event provides an opportunity to browse beautiful examples of botanical art and create some for yourselves, all while honing your observation and identification skills.

Please bring along your own twig to draw from, if possible. Art materials will be provided.

Free to members. If you are not an NHSN member, we would welcome a suggested donation of £5:
http://www.nhsn.ncl.ac.uk/join-us/make-a-donation/

Or please consider joining us:
http://www.nhsn.ncl.ac.uk/join-us/become-a-member/

Booking essential. To book, please go to Eventbrite here.

10th
May
2019

Exclusive Holidays with Naturetrek

Exclusive Holidays with Naturetrek

© Ralf Lotys

Natural History Society of Northumbria exclusive 2019 holidays with Naturetrek. For the first time we are offering two trips at different times of the year, as follows:

Poland in Spring: 10 – 17 May 2019, 8 days, £1395

The extensive forests and marshes of eastern Poland have long been a favourite of birdwatchers. This popular spring tour focuses on two of the country’s very best wildlife reserves, the primaeval forests of Bialowieza and the extensive marshlands and floodplains of Biebrza National Park. Within these two contrasting areas, you can enjoy not just the birds, but mammals also.

Romania’s Danube Delta & Carpathian Mountains: 2 – 11 September 2019, 10 days, £1695

From the extensive wetlands of the Danube basin to the high peaks of the Carpathian Mountains, Romania boasts a remarkable abundance of wildflowers, butterflies and mammals, as well as a long list of exciting birds. You will spend 3 whole days on a floating hotel exploring the waterways of the immense Danube Delta, followed by time deep in the Transylvanian Carpathians.

For more information about these trips, please call the Naturetrek office on 01962 733051 or email info@naturetrek.co.uk

Download our latest events programme here for a full itinerary of this seasons activities

About Talks, Field Trips, Events & Activities

Outdoor Events

Throughout the year, experts lead field meetings to explore the natural world and magical landscapes of Northern England.

Outdoor events are free to members and their families. Some trips require us to hire boats or pay entrance fees and details of these costs are included in the event information.

For many events, you can just turn up at the meeting place, but some events must be booked in advance and this is stated in the event information. You must make your own way to the meeting point. Please arrive early so that the event can start on time.

In order to visit the best places our trips take place in natural landscapes that can be unpredictable. It is essential that you wear, or take with you, appropriate clothing and accessories to cope with heat, cold, wet, wind, biting insects and to walk on uneven, slippery or wet surfaces. Before you join any of our outdoor events it is essential that you read our Guidance.

Some events are run in partnership with other organisations or groups, but otherwise our outdoor events are exclusively for Society members. If you are not a member and would like to attend an outdoor activity then please contact the Society Office in advance – we would welcome a donation or please consider joining us.

Indoor Events

From October to March the Society invites experts in the natural world to give inspiring lectures to our members and the wider public.

Our Friday evening lectures have changed venue. Due to popular demand for our talks, Newcastle University has kindly made available a larger venue at their Ridley Building. A map to the new venue and parking details is below, and available on this downloadable leaflet.

Entry is from 6.00pm for our new 1829 lectures (starting at 18:29). Tea, coffee and biscuits are available and the opportunity to socialise. Speakers give an illustrated presentation for 45 mins-1 hour and then open the floor for questions.

On site parking is limited to blue badge holders only. There is a public car park directly opposite the Ridley Building on Claremont Road.

Non-members are very welcome to attend, and we ask that they kindly make a donation on the night to support these lectures.

View Previous Events